December 25, 2023

Percocet Addiction: Can You Get Addicted to Percocet?

image of woman representing percocet addiction

Percocet is a medication that contains a prescription opioid painikiller (oxycodone) and an over-the-counter painkiller (acetaminophen, the active component in Tylenol). The DEA (United States Drug Enforcement Administration) classifies oxycodone as a Schedule II controlled substance. Drugs in this class have recognized medical applications alongside a high potential for abuse and addiction. 

If you have been prescribed this combination medication and you are concerned about becoming addicted to Percocet, read on to learn more about the dangers of opioids.

Is Percocet Addictive?

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Percocet, like all Schedule II substances, has a significant potential for addiction. The euphoric effects produced by Percocet are comparable to those of heroin, an illicit and dangerous narcotic, due to the presence of oxycodone in this combination medication.

While Percocet proves highly effective as a short-term painkiller, tolerance to its effects can rapidly develop. As individuals experience diminishing effects, they may be inclined to increase the opioid dosage or frequency, prompting patterns of misuse. Continued, non-prescribed use of Percocet often accelerates the onset of physical dependence, culminating in the manifestation of opioid use disorder (Percocet) addiction.

Signs of a Percocet Addiction

Signs of Percocet addiction can serve as observable indicators for loved ones or healthcare professionals. These may include but are not limited to:

  • Changes in behavior: Noticeable alterations in behavior, such as increased secrecy, mood swings, or erratic actions, may signal an addiction to Percocet.
  • Physical symptoms: People addicted to Percocet may exhibit physical symptoms such as drowsiness, constricted pupils, or nodding off at inappropriate times.
  • Doctor shopping: Engaging in the practice of visiting multiple doctors to obtain additional prescriptions for Percocet may indicate addictive behavior. This is known as doctor shopping.
  • Social withdrawal: Addicted individuals may withdraw from social activities and relationships, preferring isolation to hide their substance use.
  • Financial issues: The financial strain of maintaining a Percocet addiction can lead to increased borrowing, stealing, or selling personal belongings.
  • Neglect of responsibilities: Neglecting personal, professional, or academic responsibilities due to Percocet use reflects the impact of addiction on daily life.
  • Forging prescriptions: Individuals addicted to Percocet may resort to forging or altering prescriptions to acquire more of the substance.
  • Seeking multiple sources: Actively seeking Percocet from various sources, including friends, family, or illegal channels, is a sign of escalating addiction.
  • Legal issues: Involvement in legal problems, such as arrests or charges related to Percocet possession, can be a consequence of addiction.
  • Changes in appearance: Physical changes, including weight loss, poor hygiene, or a decline in overall health, may be evident in those struggling with Percocet addiction.

If you or someone that you know is exhibiting these indicators, seek assistance from healthcare professionals, counselors, or addiction specialists to address Percocet addiction and streamline recovery.

Percocet Addiction Symptoms

Percocet addiction, clinically described as opioid use disorder, is characterized by a cluster of symptoms outlined in DSM-5-TR (the most current edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). Addiction to Percocet symptoms are as follows:

  1. Using Percocet in larger amounts or for a longer than intended.
  2. Expressing a desire to cut down or stop using Percocet but being unable to do so.
  3. Spending a significant amount of time obtaining, using, and recovering from the effects of Percocet.
  4. Experiencing intense cravings to use Percocet.
  5. Failing to fulfill obligations at home, work, or school due to Percocet use.
  6. Continuing to use Percocet despite causing or worsening social or interpersonal problems.
  7. Giving up social, recreational, or occupational activities due to Percocet use and withdrawing from family or friends to use the substance.
  8. Using Percocet in hazardous situations, such as while driving.
  9. Persisting in Percocet use despite being aware of a physical or psychological problem likely caused or worsened by substance use.
  10. Developing tolerance, requiring increased amounts of Percocet to achieve the same desired effects.
  11. Experiencing unpleasant or uncomfortable symptoms upon discontinuation of Percocet, known as withdrawal.
image of man representing percocet addiction symptoms

How Long Does it Take to Get Addicted to Percocet?

The timeframe for developing addiction to Percocet can vary from person to person and is influenced by several factors. Prolonged use of Percocet, even when taken as prescribed, can lead to the development of tolerance, where the body becomes accustomed to the drug’s effects. As tolerance increases, people may find themselves needing higher doses to achieve the same pain-relieving effects, potentially accelerating the path to addiction.

The dosage and frequency at which Percocet is taken can impact the likelihood of addiction. Taking higher doses or using the medication more frequently than prescribed can increase the risk of developing dependence and addiction.

Each person’s physiological and psychological makeup plays a role in how quickly addiction develops. Factors such as genetics, mental health, and personal susceptibility to substance use disorders can influence the onset of opioid use disorder.

Individuals with a history of substance abuse, whether related to opioids or other substances, may be at a higher risk of developing addiction to Percocet. Healthcare providers carefully consider substance use history when prescribing the medication.

The presence of co-occurring conditions, such as chronic pain or mental health disorders, can contribute to the likelihood of developing addiction. Percocet is often prescribed to manage pain, and individuals with untreated mental health conditions may be more vulnerable to the addictive properties of the medication.

While some people may develop dependence on Percocet relatively quickly, others may use the medication as prescribed without experiencing addiction. Use Percocet only as prescribed, and communicate openly about any concerns or changes in response to the medication.

Percocet Addiction Treatment

Addressing Percocet addiction requires a comprehensive and tailored approach to promote meaningful long-term recovery. The following components are routinely incorporated into Percocet addiction treatment plans:

Medical detoxification

People grappling with Percocet addiction may undergo medical detoxification under professional supervision. This process assists in managing withdrawal symptoms and ensuring safety during the initial stages of recovery.

Inpatient or outpatient rehab

Rehabilitation programs, whether inpatient or outpatient, provide structured environments in which people can address the root causes of their addictions. Inpatient programs offer intensive support, while outpatient programs enable people to engage with treatment while maintaining daily responsibilities.

Behavioral therapy

Many forms of behavioral therapy, including CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) and contingency management, are effective in treating Percocet addiction. These therapeutic approaches help individuals identify and modify maladaptive behaviors and thought patterns associated with substance use.

Group therapy

Group therapy sessions offer a supportive setting where individuals can share experiences, receive feedback, and learn from others facing similar challenges. The camaraderie and shared understanding in group settings contribute to the recovery process.

Individual counseling

One-on-one counseling with a therapist or counselor enables personalized exploration of issues underpinning Percocet addiction. A close therapeutic relationship helps individuals develop coping mechanisms and strategies for sustained recovery.

Support groups

Participating in support groups, such as 12-step programs or SMART Recovery, provides ongoing support and encouragement. These groups offer a platform for individuals to connect with peers sharing similar goals and experiences.

MAT (medication-assisted treatment)
Certain FDA-approved medications may be utilized to manage specific symptoms, such as cravings or anxiety, during the recovery process. MAT is most beneficial when incorporated into a comprehensive treatment plan.

Aftercare planning

Developing a robust aftercare plan is essential for preventing relapse and maintaining long-term recovery. Aftercare may involve ongoing therapy, participation in support groups, and the establishment of healthy coping mechanisms.

Holistic approaches

Incorporating holistic interventions like mindfulness practices, yoga, and art therapy complements traditional treatment methods, addressing the overall well-being of individuals in recovery.

Family involvement

Engaging family members in the treatment process can enhance the support system for individuals recovering from Percocet addiction. Family therapy can address relationship dynamics and educate loved ones about the challenges and strategies for recovery.

Individuals seeking treatment for Percocet addiction should consult with healthcare professionals to determine the most appropriate and effective approach tailored to their specific needs. Seeking help early in the addiction recovery journey increases the likelihood of successful rehabilitation and long-term well-being.

FAQs

How addictive are Percocets?

Percocet can be highly addictive. Tolerance and dependence to opioids develop rapidly, often but not always leading to addiction (opioid use disorder).

Is Percocet addicting when used as directed?

Percocet can be addicting when used long-term for pain relief. Consult your healthcare provider if you feel that the effects of Percocet are diminishing – this is indicative of tolerance – or if you believe that you need the medication to function (a sign of physical dependence).

Can you get addicted to Percocet quickly?

Yes. Percocet addiction can develop within weeks of regular use.

An image of a woman using addiction hotline's to find percocet addiction treatment

Call Addiction Hotline Today to Get Help for Percocet Addiction

Do you need help right away with prescription drug addiction? If so, call Addiction Hotline any time of day or night at 855-701-0479.

Over 1 million U.S. adults who needed addiction treatment in 2022 failed to get help because they didn’t know how to find the right rehab program. Hotline staff can provide you with referrals to detox centers, inpatient rehabs, and outpatient treatment centers throughout the state of California. All the rehabs we recommend deliver a blend of holistic and evidence-based treatments.

Call 855-701-0479 and kickstart your recovery from Percocet addiction right away.

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